THE SPORTING INFLUENCER

Introduction

The Sporting Influencer

According to Clark, (2008); Kremer-Sadlik & Kim, (2007) within any given sport parent(s) have been highlighted as one of the major influences in a child’s level of enjoyment and participation. Having coaches youth and men’s soccer for a number of years, I’ve encountered and observed a mixture of positive e.g. Positive – encouragement, positive reinforcement, no pressure placed upon winning and Negative – aggressive sideline behavior, dictating players decision making. The effects of each approach have been discussed in the Helpful and Harmful E-Book, how to deal these matters as a coach will be discussed within future blog posts.

With soccer players continually evolving into multi-millionnaires and living luxury lifestyles, a minority of parents expect their child to reach those levels from an early age. In turn, creates unnecessary pressure and unrealistic expectations on those young players participating, which results in an overly-involved parents within youth sport. On the contrast some parents do recongise and more importantly understand the long term player development model (LTPD). Those positive parents are engaged, willing and open to understand how to become a positive sporting influencer, thus increasing a child’s enjoyment in the game.

These blogs will highlight and share positive and negative contributions and potentially educate coaches about how to deal with an array of matters and/or concerns within the coaching environment. I wish to clarify that any suggestions that are made, must be carefully replicated and in most cases adapted to one’s environment and individual and/or team communicating with. I must reiterate “one size fits all” doesn’t apply in this context

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10,000 hour myth – Misunderstood by sports parents?

10,000 hour myth – Misunderstood by sports parents?

written by Gordon MacLelland 

Many parents will now be aware or have heard of the 10,000 hour rule publicised by Malcolm Gladwell.  The principle holds that 10,000 hours of “deliberate practice” are needed to become world-class in any field whether it is in music, business, art or sport.

However, what many parents are unaware of is that this rule has later been discredited on many counts and the original man behind the research Anders Ericsson has publicly bemoaned the context that Gladwell used it in his book ‘Outliers’.

Read more via 10,000 hour myth

Failure should only be seen as an opportunity to learn

Written by Gordon MacLelland, WWPIS  For any child to be able to learn, grow as a human and learn about life there have to be moments of failure and during their sporting career there will be many.

Source: Failure should only be seen as an opportunity to learn

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