THE SPORTING INFLUENCER

Introduction

The Sporting Influencer

According to Clark, (2008); Kremer-Sadlik & Kim, (2007) within any given sport parent(s) have been highlighted as one of the major influences in a child’s level of enjoyment and participation. Having coaches youth and men’s soccer for a number of years, I’ve encountered and observed a mixture of positive e.g. Positive – encouragement, positive reinforcement, no pressure placed upon winning and Negative – aggressive sideline behavior, dictating players decision making. The effects of each approach have been discussed in the Helpful and Harmful E-Book, how to deal these matters as a coach will be discussed within future blog posts.

With soccer players continually evolving into multi-millionnaires and living luxury lifestyles, a minority of parents expect their child to reach those levels from an early age. In turn, creates unnecessary pressure and unrealistic expectations on those young players participating, which results in an overly-involved parents within youth sport. On the contrast some parents do recongise and more importantly understand the long term player development model (LTPD). Those positive parents are engaged, willing and open to understand how to become a positive sporting influencer, thus increasing a child’s enjoyment in the game.

These blogs will highlight and share positive and negative contributions and potentially educate coaches about how to deal with an array of matters and/or concerns within the coaching environment. I wish to clarify that any suggestions that are made, must be carefully replicated and in most cases adapted to one’s environment and individual and/or team communicating with. I must reiterate “one size fits all” doesn’t apply in this context

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Failure should only be seen as an opportunity to learn

Written by Gordon MacLelland, WWPIS  For any child to be able to learn, grow as a human and learn about life there have to be moments of failure and during their sporting career there will be many.

Source: Failure should only be seen as an opportunity to learn

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Anders Giske

🤝: Anders Giske  – “Parental Involvement in Youth Sports”
💻: Founder “Giske Defending”
⚽️: UEFA A Licence Coach
🇳🇴: 38 Caps for Norway
⚽️: Ex-Professional Bayer 04 Leverkusen, FC Cologne, FC Nurnberg and others.
📝: “A-team. Norway’s Greatest Football Players of All Time.” (Sæter, Øiestad 2005)

Source: Anders Giske

Development first, winning second. How some youth coaches stunt player growth

Coaching Youth Football

There are many ways a coach can give themselves a better chance of winning youth football matches, and in my opinion many of those are short-term wins at the expense of long-term player development. In this blog post, I have recognised some of the traits of youth coaches and tried to explain what I believe are the pros and cons of each.

Essentially, I believe we should be encouraging kids to get as many touches of the ball as possible, and supporting them when they make mistakes. Mistakes are a necessary part of learning, and how we respond to those mistakes as a coach will be a huge factor in deciding what type of players we produce. If you want cautious, predictable players than tell them their every move and criticise errors. We need to be giving the kids of today the best chance of developing the skills that they…

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